Program

Sunday,  January 31, 2021

11:00 AM – 11:59 PM — Virtual EXPO

1:00 – 2:00 PM — OPENING KEYNOTE

SESSION 1KN: Landscapes of Healthy & Inclusive Communities: People, Place and Partnerships

SPEAKER: Nette Compton, Associate Vice President, Director of Strategy, The Trust for Public Land

2020 placed an enormous strain on our nation, and in particular our marginalized and underserved communities, where long-standing inequity and injustice was brought to the fore of national attention. Within our realm of practice, this tumultuous year displayed the devastating consequences of park disparities felt in many communities and highlighted in national media. What can we learn from this year, and how should it shape the practice of landscape architecture into the future?

Ms. Compton will highlight what we know about current access to public spaces across race and income, and how we can address these inequities through policy and design. Examples of how quality public space has fostered community connections, support, and resources will highlight the value parks bring to their communities. Innovations in land use and public engagement during COVID will highlight novel solutions that will continue to have value in a post-pandemic world.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • Understand the current distribution and access to public space across the US, and how this varies by population.
  • Integrate community impacts into public space process and creation to improve health, climate and equity outcomes.
  • Apply remote community engagement techniques to enhance stakeholder input.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS:

  • NJ: 1 pending approval
  • LACES: 1
  • NY: 1
  • AICP: 1

Sponsored by ANOVA logo

2:30 – 3:30 PM

SESSION 2B: Inspiring the Next Generation of Diverse Landscape Architects

SPEAKER: Jennifer Nitzky, RLA, ASLA, ISA, Design Principal – Studio HIP

One of the most effective ways to inspire a career path is through hands-on experience. Community engagement and participatory activities for children in diverse neighborhoods, like those found in NYC, help to foster increased awareness of the field of landscape architecture and cultivate the development of future landscape architects. Since 1996, the Trust for Public Land’s NYC Playgrounds Program has transformed over 208 barren asphalt schoolyards into vibrant, green community playgrounds – all designed by the students themselves. Over 6,800 students became “landscape architects in training” during this engaging process. They performed all design tasks – from site analysis through site planning – making equitable design decisions based on how they and their fellow students would use the new schoolyard. The result, in every case, were new playgrounds that increased environmental benefits for the school but also created high-quality community amenities for surrounding neighborhoods. Through this and other stewardship programs we have been able to introduce children of diverse ethnicities, cultures and socio-economic status to the profession of landscape architecture with the hope of sparking an interest in further study of the profession. Programs such as the NYC Playgrounds Program open a window to the future for children of underserved populations.

During her presentation, Jennifer Nitsky will highlight the structure of the Trust for Public Land’s NYC Playgrounds Program through discussion and illustrated case studies.  Examples featured during the presentation will serve as inspiration for you to work in your own schools and communities to elevate awareness of the profession and help inspire future landscape architects.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • Gain insight into how participatory design is used in the classroom to develop school playgrounds.
  • Learn about the Trust for Public Land’s NYC Playgrounds Program and how they have transformed schoolyards in a wide diversity of communities.
  • Discover tips and tools for engaging with elementary school students to create awareness of the profession of landscape architecture.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS:

  • NJ: 1
  • LACES – HSW: 1 HSW
  • NY: 1
  • AICP: 1

4:00 – 5:00 PM — CONCURRENT SESSIONS

SESSION 3A: After Life: The Future of Burial in the United States

SPEAKER: Kathleen John-Alder, FASLA, Associate Professor, Department of Landscape Architecture, Rutgers University

This presentation examines the future of burial in the United States, and it reflects the work of the second-year landscape architecture graduate design studio’s focus on green burial practices conducted by Kathleen John-Alder at Rutgers University in the fall of 2019.  A law passed in Washington State on May 21, 2020, which allows for natural organic reduction as an alternative to traditional burials and cremation, served as an important impetus for the studio. The bill describes this alternative practice as the “contained conversion of human remains to soil.” Proponents of the bill note it is an environmentally friendly alternative to normative practices that provides greater range of choice in how people choose to dispose of their remains. In this process, the body is covered with natural materials, like straw, alfalfa, and wood chips, and over the course of three to seven weeks, microbial activity breaks it down into approximately two wheelbarrows of soil. The family then determines how they use the soil, whether to plant a tree, nurture a meadow, or spread it in a place of importance in the life of the deceased, just as they might for cremated ashes.

New Jersey is a densely populated, multicultural state, represented by numerous religions and burial practices, and thus an intriguing venue to explore burial in the 21st century. Accordingly, the material presented explores burial practices in different cultures, countries, and religions; new high-tech alternatives to these historical practices; and the transport and preparation of the body following death. Students subsequently used the information to design a green cemetery, or organic reduction facility. The results of these efforts honor both life and death, while also critically examining how burial is done in the United States and around the world. Kathleen John-Alder and students from the class will deliver the presentation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • Understand the historical importance of landscape architecture in cemetery design.
  • Integrate new burial technologies into the design of cemeteries.
  • Relate cemetery design to issues of energy conservation and sustainability.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS:

  • NJ: 1
  • LACES – HSW: 1 HSW
  • NY – HSW: 1 HSW
  • AICP: 1

SESSION 3B: Landscaping with a Purpose: What's Diversity Got To Do With It?

SPEAKER: Randi V. Wilfert Eckel, PhD, Owner and Founder, Toadshade Wildflower Farm.

What is the role of diversity in the garden and what do we gain by increasing diversity in our gardens, fields, and forests? Despite the wealth of native plant species at our fingertips, we rely too heavily on too few species. By using the great diversity of plants that are native to a region, we can beautify the landscape, minimize inputs, support wildlife, and do away with the ecological deserts created in seas of mulch and functionally sterile lawns. Randi will discuss the importance of native plant and insect diversity in creating a functional ecosystem, as well as how understanding Ecoregions (areas where the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources are generally similar) can help inform plant choice in the landscape.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • Understand the importance of native plant diversity in creating functioning ecosystems.
  • Identify the components of a successful habitat garden.
  • Appreciate the importance of embracing insect diversity in landscapes.
  • Understand the value of using Ecoregion information to inform plant choice.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS:

  • NJ: 1
  • LACES – HSW: 1 HSW
  • NY – HSW: 1 HSW
  • AICP: 1
  • ISA: 1

5:30 – 6:30 PM — KEYNOTE SESSION

SESSION 4KN: Hybrid Landscapes

SPEAKER: Walter Hood, Creative Director and Founder, Hood Design Studio

Walter Hood will discuss some of his recent innovative urban spaces, landscape architecture and public art projects. In each of them past and future matter equally to complicate the ways we understand memory of space and its revitalization in the present. The lens through which he will illuminate his own work is that of postcolonialism, drawing on such influential theorists as W.E.B. DuBois, W. J. T. Mitchell and Robert J. C. Young. In doing so, he will emphasize our current critical postcolonial moment probing how concepts such as hybridity and difference may interrogate the design of public landscapes.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • Attendees will learn how to identify and critique postcolonial landscapes
  • Attendees will be able to interpret cultures as well as their differences and similarities in the public landscape
  • Attendees will understand the key principles behind form formal and informal hybrid landscapes

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS:

  • NJ: 1
  • LACES: 1
  • NY: 1
  • AICP: 1

Sponsored by  Commercial Recreation Specialists

7:00 – 8:00 PM — LIVE DISCUSSION WITH THE 2021 ANNUAL AWARD JURORS

Moderated by NJASLA Design Award Chair and Vice Chair

Sponsored by  Permaloc Logo

Monday, February 1, 2021

12:00 AM – 11:59 PM — Virtual EXPO

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM — CONCURRENT SESSIONS

SESSION 5A: Detroit Collaborative Design Center: Engaging Youth for Equitable Outcomes

SPEAKER: Charles Cross, ASLA Director of Landscape Architecture, Detroit Collaborative Design Center, Fulbright-Hays Fellow

The Detroit Collaborative Design Center (DCDC) is a non-profit multidisciplinary architecture and urban design firm at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Architecture.  DCDC was founded in 1994 has worked with over 100 nonprofit organizations, community groups, philanthropic foundations and faith-based groups throughout Detroit.

In this presentation, we will examine the role youth can play as a way of understanding the needs of the larger community. Youth tend to give their honest opinions with no filters and can provide tremendous insight into the issues plaguing a community. This goes to the core of equitable design. All too often designers proclaim they are giving the community a voice. I reject this notion. The community has a voice that is not being listened to. We need to increase the volume of the diminished voices in underserved communities of color.

This discussion will explore three projects in Detroit which youth have informed and/or driven the design process through hands on and experiential engagement. The scale of each engagement ranges from a single classroom of middle school students highly accustomed to sustainable practices, a group of youth ages 3 through 15 in a neighborhood open space and a high school senior class embarking on capstone projects tailored to improve their resource starved community.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  • Participants will learn participatory design methods and inclusionary community engagement practice.
  • Participants will understand the connections between engaged design and project resilience.
  • Participants will identify the challenges and opportunities of design projects in urban communities.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS:

  • NJ: 1
  • LACES – HSW: 1 HSW
  • NY – HSW: 1 HSW
  • AICP: 1

SESSION 5B: Building Social Capital in Landscape

SPEAKER: Taewook Cha, RLA, ASLA, LEED AP, Founding Principal – Supermass Studio

Taewook Cha will present how improvements in the public realm in declining American cities can revitalize downtowns, help retain local talent and attract new talent, and build social capital. Projects completed by Supermass Studio will help illustrate these concepts such as Wisconsin Riverfront Park in Wisconsin Rapids, WI, a declining mill town in Heartland America, Mulberry Commons Park in Newark, NJ, a socio-economically distressed inner city with old heritage.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • Learn how to work with municipalities and community leaders on projects with complex socio-economic backgrounds.
  • Learn various ways of engaging local communities that builds partnerships and cultivates a sense of ownership of the project.
  • Learn how physical design of public realms can translate into socio-economic benefits for the community.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS:

  • NJ: 1
  • LACES – HSW: 1 HSW
  • NY – HSW: 1 HSW
  • AICP: 1

12:00 – 1:00 PM — PROFESSIONAL AND STUDENT MEET & GREET

Would you like to make an impact on the next generation of landscape architects? This is an opportunity for professional landscape architects to meet briefly with student attendees on Monday from 12-1 PM for an informal conversation about the profession. Please consider being a part of this event; you must elect to participate during the registration process. Additional details will be provided to those who register. NOTE: Both students and professionals who want to participate must register.

1:00 – 2:00 PM — CONCURRENT SESSION

SESSION 6A: Just Landscapes: Aspiring to Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity in Landscape Architecture

SPEAKER: Laura Lawson, Executive Dean, School of Environmental & Biological Sciences, Rutgers

The word ‘just’ is one of those English words with a confusingly broad range of meanings: just proportions (proper) just be yourself (only), just wonderful (quite), just cause (correct, fair), etc.  Just landscapes? When faced with deep structural problems underlying the myriad cultural, social, economic, and environmental crises, it is sometimes hard to see how our day-to-day work is impactful. But change the emphasis and consider our responsibility in creating just landscapes, as in spaces that are fair, equitable, honest, and conscientious, and we set ourselves and our profession on an inspiring path.

This presentation explores just landscapes through the frames of diversity, inclusion, and equity.  Diversity seeks to represent the full spectrum of human demographic difference, including race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, socio-economic status, and physical ability. In New Jersey, the most diverse state in the nation, how does diversity shape the way we teach, practice, and the profession itself? Inclusion refers to belonging and the extent to which individuals – students, employees, clients, potential users of a space – are valued, respected, accepted, and encouraged to participate. Inclusion breaks the us-them, professional-community distancing and acknowledges every individual’s expertise in helping to solve our current complex problems. Equity, at the heart of justice, is the equal distribution of society’s benefits and burdens and fairness in policy and practice that acknowledges past structural inequalities that have left an uneven playing field. This field, metaphorically and literally, fits squarely within our profession’s capacity to level and make better than ever: a just landscape.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • Examine implicit bias in landscape architecture that perpetuates unequal access and quality of designed landscapes by different populations.
  • Apply concepts of diversity, inclusion, and equity to landscape architecture.
  • Establish goals for inclusive practices in the design and planning of landscapes serving diverse populations.
  • Propose new aspirations for skills and expertise within the field that enhance our ability to support just landscapes.
  • Recommend new approaches to training and education to support diversity, inclusion, and equity in the future of landscape architecture.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS:

  • NJ: 1
  • LACES – HSW: 1 HSW
  • NY – HSW: 1 HSW
  • AICP: 1

SESSION 6B: Connecting through Storytelling

SPEAKER: Sahar Coston-Hardy, Photographer, Associate ASLA

This presentation will explore the benefits of community engagement through visual storytelling. Community engagement is an integral part of the design process and there are myriad ways in which to successfully connect with communities. From the lens of a landscape architecture photographer, we will review the collaboration and engagement process through five case studies, ranging from small scale projects, to larger planning efforts. We will examine the ways photography, audio, and video were used as tools to successfully engage with communities, so that they could tell their stories from their perspectives and in some cases, help inform the projects’ final design. We will also discuss how this storytelling gives the viewer a deeper and more meaningful understanding of the project.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • Attendees will gain an understanding of how collaborating with artists can enhance relationship building within communities.
  • Attendees will learn how to use photography and video to better explain the design intent to clients and the communities that they serve.
  • Attendees will become familiar with the benefits that photography can provide stakeholder engagement through all stages of a project’s life cycle.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS:

  • NJ: 1
  • LACES: 1
  • NY: 1
  • AICP: 1

2:30 – 3:30 PM — CONCURRENT SESSIONS

SESSION 7A: Spatial Activism: Empowering & Engaging Youth as Justice Designers

SPEAKER: Prescott Reavis, NOMA, LEED AP, SEED, NCARB

Combining generations of unfair planning practices, paired with the excessive policing of Black and Brown communities throughout the US, citizens have clearly shown through marches and demonstrations they will not be subjected to these negative systems anymore.  How can we, as designers, planners, and educators of the built environment, help to shape the next generations of spatial activists? By co-creating and flipping the traditional top-down planning and design processes, we can engage and empower young people who have historically not been included in shaping their neighborhoods.  What are the cutting-edge design & planning programs and policies which center youth as the catalyst for diversity, justice, equity, and inclusion as the next generation of holistic designers? Young people in the design process naturally bring a viewpoint that envisions a community for all, including accessibility, coexisting with nature, economic prosperity, and cultural celebration. Through global programs, projects, and policies, this session will help you learn how to work with young people; merging restorative justice, landscape architecture, architecture, planning, and workforce development while discussing critical questions around:

  • How do we augment, amplify, and disrupt the current education curriculum through design and collaborative learning?
  • Why is it important to bring young people, even at an early age, to the table to engage them in the design and planning process in a meaningful way?
  • How can we create authentic pathways into our professions for children and youth through our design and planning processes?
  • What are the benefits to design firms and professions to create an equity-infused process when collaborating with community members of all ages on projects genuinely?

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • Identify current and future projects that will integrate young people in the planning and design process.
  • Summarize the opportunities and values of engaging young people to improve the community and public projects overall engaging and outreach effectiveness.
  • Explore the opportunities in practice and school to integrate equity and justice-based outreach processes for engaging Black and Brown communities

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS:

  • NJ: 1
  • LACES – HSW: 1 HSW
  • NY: 1
  • AICP: 1

SESSION 7B: Incorporating Compost into Urban Environments

 SPEAKER: Emma Yates, Business Development, WeCare Denali

This session explores the wide-ranging benefits of compost and how Landscape Architects can use compost to improve project outcomes. Designed for beginners and experts alike, Emma Yates will address how amending soil with compost affects soil health on the chemical, physical and microbial scale. Technical research and analysis will be used to fuel the discussion on how adding compost improves infiltration abilities of a soil as well as qualitatively comparing compost against other soil amendments. Emma will share how to interpret a compost data sheet, measure product quality, and identify the important factors that need to be considered when specifying compost. This session will also review projects that have taken advantage of the benefits of compost, including turf establishment, planting soils, green infrastructure, topdressing, and mulching.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to identify how a project would benefit from compost amended soils.
  • At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to understand how to ensure quality compost is specified.
  • At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to interpret a compost technical data sheet (testing sheet).

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS:

  • NJ: 1
  • LACES – HSW: 1 HSW
  • NY – HSW: 1 HSW
  • AICP: 1
  • ISA: 1

4:00 – 5:00 PM — KEYNOTE SESSION

SESSION 8KN: Notes on Resilience

SPEAKER: Kofi Boone, FASLA, Professor of Landscape Architecture, NC State University

From the ongoing COVID pandemic to the rebellions that have gripped communities around the world in the aftermath of the police murder of George Floyd, unprecedented popular attention has been paid to systemic inequities in our environments. What might this mean for landscape architecture? This talk will use the topic of resilience as a means to acknowledge our strong professional toolset for addressing non-human ecological matters but also call attention to the need to build more robust and impactful tools for nurturing human resilience.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will gain awareness of how historic demographic, landform and development patterns contribute to current environmental justice issues.
  • At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will learn multidisciplinary perspectives about the role partnerships can play in sustaining long-term resilience efforts.
  • At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will understand how landscape architects can effectively work collaboratively with environmental justice communities.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS:

  • NJ: 1
  • LACES – HSW: 1 HSW
  • NY – HSW: 1 HSW
  • AICP: 1

Sponsored by General Recreation Logo

Tuesday, February 2, 2021

12:00 AM – 11:59 PM — Virtual EXPO

10:00 – 11:00 AM — KEYNOTE SESSION

SESSION 9KN: The City is a Landscape: Empathy, Identity, and Public Space

SPEAKER: David A. Rubin, PLA, FASLA, FAAR, Principal, DAVID RUBIN Land Collective

Our civic environments have seen a seminal shift in the use of public spaces, reflective of both increased density and ongoing social injustices. Landscape is one of the most politically rich disciplines and is reflective of culture – we define ourselves by the landscapes we occupy. In an era when there is the aspiration to promote conversation, and therefore greater understanding, but proximity can mean illness or death, how do we describe thoughtful, empathetic spaces that reflect an equitable outcome? Empathy and design problem-solving are at the forefront of establishing great communities while reinforcing identity within the connective tissue of our robust cities.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • Understand design as a cultural practice, recognizing and leveraging the cultural attributes of sites and their communities.
  • Manage sensitivities inherent in facilitating change within existing landscapes and among embedded stakeholders.
  • Recognize when cultural contexts have the opportunity to shape a project and how content is perceived by audiences during design and after completion of a project.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS:

  • NJ: 1
  • LACES: 1
  • NY: 1
  • AICP: 1

Sponsored by Liberty Lighting Group, Inc.

11:30 AM – 12:30 PM — Concurrent Sessions

SESSION 10A: Storm Water Solutions & Blue Acres Restoration in Industrial Areas

SPEAKERS: Edward W. Blanar, CEO, Enviroscapes Inc.; Kimberly Rennick, RLA, LEED AP, NJDEP Green Acres Program; Nancy P. Sadlon, Manager of Public Affairs, Phillips 66 Bayway Refinery; Christiana Pollack, CFM, GISP, Ecologist

Recent catastrophic events such as Hurricane Irene, Superstorm Sandy and storms of increasing intensity, have made it apparent that different solutions are needed for storm water management in vulnerable areas. Among these solutions are the use of rain gardens of various sizes for localized storm water management of paved and other high runoff areas. The environmental management of areas that repeatedly flood with resulting extensive damage and claims is being reexamined. This includes so-called “Blue Acre” projects, which involves the governmental purchase of properties and buildings, demolition, installation of storm water management/retention/infiltration solutions and vegetative restoration/reclamation. The session will discuss the opportunities and constraints in both physical and regulatory contexts. A case study for projects in a highly industrialized city, Linden, New Jersey will be explored. Linden, NJ is located about halfway between Newark and New Brunswick, directly across from Staten Island, NJ on the Arthur Kill.  It is adjacent to one of the most highly industrialized areas in New Jersey. While there is a very long history of industrialization and decades of environmental abuse, the City has large areas of suburban residential areas. It will be demonstrated that these environmental management techniques can be utilized effectively even in highly industrialized areas.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • As a result of this session, participants will be able to identify opportunities and constraints for alternative storm water management in vulnerable areas and how they may be used to protect public health, safety, and welfare.
  • As a result of this session, participants will be better able to identify and recommend various storm water management techniques and selection of vegetation types and locations for such management.
  • As a result of this session, participants will be able to understand the regulatory and physical limits utilizing alternative storm water management including in heavily industrialized areas.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS:

  • NJ: 1
  • LACES – HSW: 1 HSW
  • NY – HSW: 1 HSW
  • AICP: 1

SESSION 10B: Landscape Architecture’s Singularity

SPEAKER: Andrew Sargeant, ASLA, Founder, LayerCake

The Oxford Dictionary defines the Singularity as “A hypothetical moment in time when artificial intelligence and other technologies have become so advanced that humanity undergoes a dramatic and irreversible change.” But if you remove artificial intelligence from the definition and focus on “dramatic and irreversible change,” the singularity is already here for landscape architecture. History has shown that technology has the potential to revolutionize the way we think, design, and work, but adopting the slow adoption of new useful technology has stagnated our profession. It has become apparent the existing educational systems and distribution of professional knowledge is not equipped to tackle this issue. Andrew Sargeant has been working with the Digital Technology PPN for over a year to best create a solution to this problem. Out of this desperate need, LayerCake was founded. LayerCake is a digital bureau that specializes in digitally driven solutions for all phases and aspects of landscape architectural design. LayerCake offers an expansive learning management system delivering inventive content disseminating best practices in design technology. Topics of exploration include but are not limited to immersive technology, parametric modeling, and building information modeling (B.I.M.). Together we can remove the predilections around design technology in our field and learn scalable solutions to bolster our practice and impact on the world.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • Recognize the common perceived challenges fellow practitioners identified in a recent survey when considering new site design, analysis, and visualization technology.
  • Gain an understanding of how putting off new technology adoption can have adverse implications on your project efficiency in a competitive business climate.
  • Explore what new technologies are currently shaping the profession, and how available resources can make the use of these technologies in your firm easier than you think.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS:

  • NJ: 1
  • LACES – HSW: 1 HSW
  • NY: 1
  • AICP: 1

1:00 – 2:00 PM — Diversity Initiative

Join an engaging discussion about strategies to foster greater diversity, equity and inclusion in NJASLA, our profession, and our work that impacts the built environment. The Diversity Initiative program, followed by a The Impacts of Racism on the Built Environment, are a two-part series, but each can be taken without the other. If you plan to participate in these interactive programs, please indicate that in the registration process so the organizers can contact you in advance.

2:30 – 3:30 PM — Concurrent Sessions

SESSION 11A: The Impacts of Racism on the Built Environment

Facilitator: Richard Alomar, RLA, Chair, Department of Landscape Architecture, Rutgers

This session includes an interactive discussion and charette that will explore the impacts of racism on the built environment and address planning and design strategies for diversity, inclusion, equity and social justice. The long-term impacts of systemic racism are evident throughout all of our communities. From a history of redlining and exclusionary housing practices to problematic project development processes, our conventional design approaches can perpetuate and exacerbate these impacts. Landscape architects and other design professionals can play an active role in not only developing spaces that serve the community as a whole but also help shine a light on ways to acknowledge and mitigate these impacts through the planning and design process.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • Gain a deeper understanding of the impacts that systemic racism has had on the built environment and the role design professionals have played
  • Learn planning and design strategies that acknowledge and help mitigate the impacts of systemic racism on the built environment
  • Learn ways to take action against racism and how even small changes in the planning and design approach can generate impacts beyond project implementation

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS:

  • NJ: 1
  • LACES: 1
  • NY: 1
  • AICP: 1

SESSION 11B: ASLA Contract Documents & Administration Guidelines

SPEAKERS: Lawrence Powers, Esq.

Landscape architects developing and entering into contracts have traditionally had to rely upon client prepared and/or AIA or other standard contract documents. ASLA, through the work of volunteers, staff and legal advisors, has developed two great member benefits. Now available are ASLA Contract Documents which are specifically geared towards Landscape Architects rather than other professions. As part of the ASLA National Professional Practice Committee, the Business Owner Support Subcommittee has also developed “Guidelines for Contract Administration”. ASLA National Professional Practice Committee Past Chairman, Jeffrey A. Tandul, LLA, ASLA, M.Arch. will briefly introduce the background regarding the development and application of these valuable documents and Larry Powers, Esq. will delve into the details of the contents in these documents and their application in practice. The session will also discuss some of the unforeseen contractual issues and obligations that need consideration in light of the recent COVID-19 Pandemic.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to better understand contract administration, their obligations and responsibilities.
  • At the conclusion of this session, participants will be better able to utilize contract documents geared specifically to the Landscape Architecture profession.
  • At the conclusion of this session, participants will be better able to develop contracts that clearly define their role and responsibility on projects and more clearly define contractual obligations of parties to their contracts.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS:

  • NJ: 1
  • LACES – HSW: 1 HSW
  • NY: 1
  • AICP: 1

4:00 – 5:00 PM — Closing Keynote

SESSION 12KN: Parks are Essential Services — Lessons in Designing for Health through the COVID-19 Pandemic

SPEAKER: Giselle Sebag, MPH, LEED AP ND, Fitwel Amb | Cities Consultant—Bloomberg Associates

What is the value of parks and greenspaces during a global disease pandemic?

With the continued spread of COVID-19, we are all being asked to adapt and settle into a “new normal” for the unforeseeable future. Cities across the United States and the world are responding with measures to slow and contain the spread of COVID-19 through mask-wearing, physical distancing, hygiene measures and self-quarantine, as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Although variations of these stay-at-home orders routinely allow exceptions for essential activities that include spending time outdoors within a safe physical distance of others, local leaders are facing pressure to close public parks and open spaces altogether in order to control waves of infection. However, taking the drastic step to close all public parks and outdoor spaces to solve one public health crisis will inadvertently create another by inhibiting the significant physical and mental health benefits of time spent outdoors with nature.

This talk will highlight and expand upon the latest public health guidance for visitors, park administrators, managers and landscape designers to create and secure the vital public health benefits of spending time outdoors in nature for all residents, while offering practical strategies for landscape architects to enable healthy parks and outdoor usage while we live through this pandemic, based on case studies in Atlanta, Georgia and Lima, Peru. We will also touch upon the health equity challenges practitioners face when soliciting public participation and providing equitable access to greenspace for the most vulnerable residents. A first-of-its-kind parks equity index and public facing dashboard will be presented as a possible tool in diagnosing and directing parks investments into the neighborhoods that will see the greatest positive impact from landscape architecture projects.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • Describe the scientific evidence linking outdoor exercise and exposure to nature with physical and mental health benefits.
  • Identify challenges that landscape architects are facing regarding safe parks and public space management and usage and offer evidence-based design solutions.
  • Suggest effective surveying methodologies and strategies for improving health equity through safe and sustainable park and open space site design.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS:

  • NJ: 1
  • LACES – HSW: 1 HSW
  • NY – HSW: 1 HSW
  • AICP: 1

Sponsored by Proven Winners/Spring Meadow Nursery

5:00 PM 2021 — Annual Meeting Adjourned

Thank you to our sponsors